Chance the Rapper’s Art and Activism, and the Perils of Prison Reform

Chance the Rapper’s Art and Activism, and the Perils of Prison Reform

Illustration by Aurélia Durand


Chance is one of the biggest stars in hip-hop, and one of the most political musicians working today. In the midst of nationwide protests for racial justice, he talks with David Remnick about his commitment to the city of Chicago and his journey toward calling himself an activist. Plus: Sarah Stillman interviews two journalists and prison abolitionists who examine how policies designed to end mass incarceration end up expanding the reach of the prison-industrial system. And, on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the filmmaker Rodney Evans discusses his documentary “Vision Portraits,” which tells the stories of three artists who are, like him, visually impaired.


Chance the Rapper’s Art and Activism

Chance is one of the biggest stars in hip-hop, and one of the most political musicians working today. He talks with David Remnick about the fight for racial justice in his home city of Chicago.


The Perils of Prison Reform

The movement to reduce mass incarceration has relied on probation, drug courts, and electronic monitoring. Two prison abolitionists argue that these measures do as much harm as good.


A New Documentary Explores How to Make Art While Blind

“Vision Portraits,” which has been streaming on PBS, examines the work of a writer, a dancer, and a photographer who are—like the filmmaker—visually impaired.


Published at Fri, 17 Jul 2020 18:37:00 +0000

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